Five Things You Did Not Know About Child Custody in New York

Here are Five Things You Did Not Know About Child Custody in New York:

  1. No Court Order means No Rights: For unmarried parents — without a Court Order, you do not have any enforceable rights to custody. This is why if you are an unmarried parent, it is very important to go to Court to get a Court Order for your rights. If you are married, you have certain rights, but, again, to make your rights clear and enforceable, it is important to consult with an attorney to determine if you need to get a Court Order.
  2. Failure to Pay Child Support Does Not Necessarily Affect Custody: If a parent does not pay their child support, it does not necessarily affect their custody rights. Therefore, even if that parent is not paying child support, you cannot unilaterally refuse that parent their parenting time. However, you may want to consult with an attorney to see what can be done with a Court order.
  3. Children’s Wishes May Effect Custody: The key word here is “May”. The older a child is, then the more that their wishes will have an effect on which parent gets custody. However, until a child is 18 years of age, the Court does not have to follow the child’s wishes.
  4. Parental Alienation and False Allegations are Two “Negative” Factors: There are a few factors that the Court will consider when awarding custody. If one parent has engaged in parental alienation or has made false allegations against the other parent, then that will be considered a negative factor against the parent engaging in parental alienation or making the false allegations. In many cases, a Court will award custody to the “innocent” parent even if there are other factors that normally would grant custody to the parent who is engaging in parental alienation or is the one making the false allegations.
  5. In New York, Joint Custody means …: Typically, the term joint custody means that both parents have joint legal custody. This gives both parents the right to make major decisions in the upbringing of their child. Major decisions are usually defined as: medical decisions, religious upbringing, educational decisions, and sometimes what extracurricular activities the child engages in.

David Badanes and the Badanes Law Office, P.C. have represented numerous parents in their custody actions and in their divorce. Contact the Badanes Law Office, P.C. today at 631-239-1702, email at david@dbnylaw.com or visit our web site: www.dbnylaw.com.

What You Can Do if Your Ex-Spouse Take Your Child Out of The Country (Without Your Consent?)

Although, it rarely happens, there are instances where an ex-spouse will improperly and without your permission, take your child out of the country. Here is what you can do.

In order to leave the United States, each United States citizen will need a passport. For children under 18 years of age, there are special laws about obtaining a passport. If the child is under the age of 16 years of age, then both parents must agree to obtain the passport. For children who are 16 years and older (and under 18 years of age), then only one parent is needed to obtain the passport.

Once a child has a passport, then either parent who has access to that passport, will be able to use it to take the child out of the United States.

If you believe that your ex-spouse is going to take your child out of the United States, but, the child is still in the United States, then you need to protect your rights to prevent this from happening. You need to immediately get an Order from the Court preventing your ex-spouse from taking the child out of the United States, and also to obtain the child’s passport. The Court’s order should be very clear that the child’s passport should be returned to you and that the child cannot be removed from the country without your written consent.

If the child has already been taken out of the country, then you still need to go to Court to get your child back into the United States. In that case, the Court will look at the following factors to determine if the child should be returned to the United States:

  1. Habitual Residence: The Court will look to see what was the child’s “Habitual Residence”. The Court will look to see: the child’s actual residence, length of time spent at that residence, and whether the child is engaged in school or other activities that would suggest this residence was the child’s permanent residence at the time of removal.
  2. Was the Removal a Breach of Your Custody Rights: Was the removal of the child a breach of your custody rights. Essentially, the court will review the custody agreement and any prior court orders.
  3. Did you give implicit approval to the child being removed. The Court will determine if you gave implicit approval of the child being removed. This could be by some acts that you did or by not actually objecting to the removal.

If your child has been removed from the country, or you suspect that the other parent may attempt to remove the child, you need to contact David Badanes and the Badanes Law Office, P.C. to know your rights.

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