Children’s Sports Participation After Divorce

Divorce is an already complicated process that can get even more complex when the case at hand involves children. There are many elements to discuss when it comes to children that should be included in the official divorce agreement. One important aspect that cannot be overlooked is a discussion about the children’s participation in activities such as sports. Children often deeply care about sports, and since these activities require money, scheduling, and transportation, it is a topic that is necessary to discuss in a divorce agreement.

Mr. David Badanes Esq. of Badanes Law Office on Long Island has shared what should be discussed in a divorce agreement between parents of a child who participates in sports.

  • Payment: Parents should discuss and decide who will pay for registration fees, who will pay for equipment (shoes, pads, uniforms, etc.) and who will pay for travel expenses. These expenses may recur every month, season and/or year, so a payment plan should be outlined in the agreement.
  • Transportation: When children participate in sports, they commit to attending practice, home games and away games. Divorced parents need to arrange who will transport the child to all these events, especially games that are out-of-town.
  • Participation: Divorced parents should agree upon how many sports the children are allowed to participate in at a given time. Scheduling is an important factor to consider when looking into the time your child has available to put aside for sports.

In addition to ensuring these necessary elements are a part of the divorce agreement, divorced parents should also strive to put the needs of the children first at sports events and put their own personal issues aside. Mr. David Badanes Esq. recommends divorced parents of children in sports heed these specific reminders.

  • Both parents can attend sporting events. Even if the child has parenting time with a specific parent during the time of a sports activity, both parents can still attend the event. A custody schedule does not prohibit parents from seeing their child at sports games.
  • Let the child choose. When it comes to which sports the child participates in, it should always be the child’s choice. The type of sports the child participates in should not be according to what a parent wants. Though a parent may be extremely passionate about a specific sport, children’s interests often change day by day—a child may want to play basketball one day and soccer the next.
  • You are there to cheer on your child. Your child’s sports event is not the place to discuss anything about the divorce or post-divorce issues. While attending the event, refrain from fighting with your ex-spouse. Instead focus your attention to your child playing his/her game.

If your child participates in sports, it is vital the divorce agreement determines all issues involved in the child’s sports participation. This will allow for a smoother transition for not only the parents, but most importantly the children who will inevitably feel the stress of the divorce as well.

David Badanes, Esq. and the Badanes Law Office, P.C. provides real-world advice to help you through this challenging time. If you are contemplating getting a divorce, and need an attorney to represent you, call David Badanes and the Badanes Law Office today at 631-239-1702, email at david@dbnylaw.com or visit our web site: www.dbnylaw.com. The Badanes Law Office has offices in Northport, Suffolk County and Uniondale, Nassau County.

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