Can A Spouse Stay On A Mortgage After The Divorce?

If you and your spouse are both on a mortgage, in most divorces, either the property will be sold or one party will buy-out the other parties’ interest in the property. In those instances, either both spouses will be removed from the mortgage or only one spouse will remain on the mortgage.

However, there are some cases, where both parties want to keep the property and do not want to change the mortgage. Can both spouses stay on a mortgage after the divorce? Can one spouse stay on a mortgage after the divorce? The short answer is “yes”, it is possible that either one or both spouses can stay on a mortgage after the divorce. However, in order for that to happen, you will need to do the following.

1. If the divorce is settled, then in the settlement agreement, it must be very clear that one or both parties will remain on the mortgage. The agreement will also have to specify what happens if the mortgage is not paid. It is very important to place safeguards in the agreement, so that if the mortgage is not paid, on time, that either the other party can pay the mortgage, or the property will be sold.

The agreement should also state what happens when the property does get sold or what happens when one party no longer wants to be on the mortgage.

The bottom line is that the agreement has to think of all the things that can go wrong (i.e. the mortgage not getting paid) and also has to deal with situations where even if the mortgage is getting paid, on time, how long that will be allowed to happen.

2. If the divorce goes to trial, most likely a Judge would not allow both parties to remain on the mortgage (except, perhaps for a very short time). Usually, a Judge would order the property to be sold. If only party was on the mortgage, then a Judge may allow that party to continue to remain on the mortgage, but, the Judge will put strict limits on how long and what happens if the mortgage is not paid.

There are many contingencies and scenarios that have to be considered with a mortgage. David Badanes, Esq. and the Badanes Law Office, P.C. have drafted numerous divorce agreements that arrange for how a mortgage is handled after a divorce.

If you are thinking of getting divorced, call David Badanes and the Badanes Law Office today at 631-239-1702 or email at david@dbnylaw.com. We have offices in Northport, Suffolk County and in Uniondale, Nassau County.

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Are Separate Bank Accounts Considered Marital Property?

In general terms, all assets acquired after marriage are considered marital property. Also, generally, it does not matter if one person is listed as the owner of the property, it is still considered marital property.

To determine if a separate bank account is considered marital property, ask yourself the following questions:

1. Was the bank account opened after marriage? If yes, then it almost always will be considered marital property. The exceptions would be if the monies placed in the bank account came solely from an inheritance, gift or a personal injury award. If all the monies placed in the bank account did come from an inheritance, gift or personal injury award, then that money is considered separate property and therefore the bank account and the money in it is also your separate property.

If the bank account was opened before the marriage, then go to question number 2.

2. If after the marriage: Did you place any joint monies, your wages or other marital funds into the bank account? If after the marriage, you put your pay check, or other marital funds into this bank account, then at the very least that money would be considered marital property. Furthermore, depending on the circumstances, all of the money in the bank account could be considered marital property.

If you answered no to this question, then most likely all the monies in the separate bank account will be considered your separate property. This is because you did not place any marital funds into the bank account.

If you have questions about what is marital property or separate property, David Badanes, Esq. and the Badanes Law Office, P.C. can answer your questions and help you. If you are considering getting a divorce or you have been served with divorce papers, then call David Badanes, Esq. at 631-239-1702 or email at david@dbnylaw.com. The Badanes Law Office has offices in Northport and Uniondale on Long Island, NY.

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